War of 1812 myths persist

While I write this, the government’s events to mark the War of 1812 are kicking into high gear. This fall marks a few key events: the captures of Fort Mackinaw and Detroit by Major-General Sir Isaac Brock, and the repulsion of an American invasion at the Battle of Queenston Heights. Of course the war wasn’t over in just two months. Most operations were confined to Upper Canada; essentially modern-day Ontario. In a series of campaigns fought mostly during the summer months, Britain and America battled for control of Canada. Today, the war is 200 years into the past, and both sides claim victory. As funny as it sounds, that may even be true. The war ended, not with a total victory on one side, but with a treaty. Continue reading →

Canada Post to play a tune for jazz-man Oliver Jones

One of next year’s Black History stamps has already been announced, a stamp honouring 78-year-old jazz great Oliver Jones. The Montreal-born musician grew up just a few doors down from Oscar Peterson, and at one time studied piano under Daisy Peterson Sweeney, the performer’s sister. Jones was a child prodigy who started playing songs by memory at the age of three, and first performed at the age of five at Union United Church in Montreal. Continue reading →

Stamps help Canadian stereotypes stick

They depict, as do dozens of other secular Christmas stamps, Canadians outdoors in winter. My thoughts went to the scene, a man in snowshoes following a woman on a toboggan pulled by a dog. They appear to be delivering a present. It occurred to me that I have never seen anyone successfully get a dog to pull a toboggan. It also occurred to me that, while I have worn snowshoes on a number of occasions, most Canadians I know have never actually snowshoed anywhere. Absolutely nobody I know, anywhere, has actually delivered or taken home a Christmas present using either method of transportation. Sure the image is all warm and fuzzy, but I wonder just how relevant it was, or is, for Canadians. Continue reading →

Canadian Postal Museum to close in overhaul

Redevelopment of the Canadian Museum of Civilization will see an end to the Canadian Postal Museum, but not to postal exhibits and collections. On Oct. 16, Minister of Canadian Heritage James Moore announced that the Canadian Museum of Civilization would become the Canadian Museum of History, with the transition to be completed by 2017, Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation. Under the redesign, the Canadian Personalities Hall, the Canada Hall, and the Canadian Postal Museum will be combined to create a new, permanent exhibition on Canadian history. Many of the artifacts, collections and stories currently found in these spaces will be re-integrated into the new gallery as they form part of our national story. Continue reading →

Early airmail stamps trigger tales of adventure

Today, more than 40 years after man first walked on the moon, and when transatlantic flights are taken with a grain of salt, we have to strain to think about what it must have been like for those early adventurers. First off, they didn’t have autopilot, GPS, satellites, radar, and constant radio contact with the ground. They had compasses, clocks, basic instruments, and if they wanted to know exactly where they were, the navigator used a sextant. The engines were often unreliable and unproven, and even aircraft design was still partly an element of guesswork. Continue reading →

Envelope celebrates musical legacy of Canada’s Royal Conservatory

Canada Post has issued a commemorative envelope for the 125th anniversary of the Royal Conservatory (RC), one of the largest and most respected music and arts education institutions in the world. As it grew to become one of the dominant musical institutions in Canada, so did its reputation for professional training, its national examination system, and its faculty of distinguished musicians. Over the years, some of Canada’s most famous musicians studied at the Royal Conservatory, including Glenn Gould, Oscar Peterson, David Foster, Sarah McLachlan and Angela Hewitt. Continue reading →

Canadian football worth celebrating

It seems that Canadian football fell out of fashion and everyone began watching the “important” teams from south of the border. You know, those guys who play on a smaller field and need an extra down to try to make 10 yards. The CFL, by nature of being Canadian, seemed to be somehow less, especially in southern Ontario, which despite the lessons of the War of 1812, often draws its cultural identity from our celebrity neighbour. This year, things changed. The CFL managed to get Canadians excited about a big number, the 100th playing of the Grey Cup, a championship that many Canadians often don’t even remember who won. Continue reading →

Nestlé Turtles stamp pokes its head out

A corporate use of picture postage has created a stir in the stamp collecting community. In early November, Canada Post outlets started selling packages of Turtles chocolate candies with prepaid postage using the new oversize-rate stamp that is now part of the picture postage series. It was the first use of the new rate, which was announced earlier in the year. Originally it had been planned to take effect Nov. 5, but that launch was rescheduled to Dec. 3. The Turtles stamp features what Canada Post describes as a vintage turtle created in a dots design, with the $1.29 rate. Canada Post spokesperson Anick Losier told Canadian Stamp News that the packages were being sold in about 4,000 post offices for $4.95. Continue reading →

Stamps disappearing, but the hobby won’t

There is nothing that collectors, Canadian Stamp News, or even Canada Post can do to reverse these long-term trends. However, there is reason to take heart. While the quantity of stamps being issued is dropping, the quality is going up at a staggering rate. By that I mean that we are seeing stamps being produced using interesting security features, such as fluorescent design elements, stamps that interact with our smartphones, and even stamps that we can create on our own, and then have drop-shipped on postcards we create on the fly. These are interesting stamps that catch the imagination. Continue reading →

December mail volume expected to hit a billion

The December mail amounts of approximately 25 per cent of Canada Post’s annual retail transactions and nearly 20 per cent of the mail sent into Canada from around the world is during the holiday season. The five biggest mailers to Canada are the United States, Britain, China, Hong Kong and South Korea. According to Cote, the single busiest day for processing mail was expected to be Dec. 13, with the heaviest delivery day being Dec. 21. Continue reading →

Keep up to date with the philatelic community

Sign up to receive our newsletter.

Canadian Stamp News

Canada

Canadian Stamp News is Canada's premier source of information about stamp collecting and related fields.

Although we cover the entire world of philatelics, the majority of our readers are Canadian, and we concentrate on the unique circumstances surrounding collecting in our native land.

Send Us Your Event

Running an event? Send it to us and we will display it on Canadian Stamp News!

Submit Event →

Subscribe To 26 Issues For Just $47.99/year

Subscribe today to receive Canada's premier stamp publication. Canadian Stamp News is available in both paper and digital forms.

Subscribe Now