OTD: Iron ore smelted in Canada for first time

On today’s date in 1737, iron ore was smelted for the first time in Canada on the banks of the St. Maurice River, upstream from Trois-Rivières, Que.

Today, Parks Canada operates the Forges du St.-Maurice – the birthplace of Canada’s iron industry – as a National Historic Site. It was established nearly 300 years ago, on March 25, 1730, after two companies (the first failing rather quickly) were granted a monopoly to extract the iron ore deposits at Trois-Rivières. Eight years later, the forge began operating and remained in near-continuous operation until closing in 1883. It employed about 100 craftsmen and upwards of 400 labourers to produce forged and molded iron products.

Newfoundland reused the Bell Island design on another 24-cent stamp (SC #241) issued in 1937. An image of King George VI, whose coronation took place on the date of issue, was added to the stamp's design.

Newfoundland reused the Bell Island design on another 24-cent stamp (SC #241) issued in 1937. An image of King George VI, whose coronation took place on the date of issue, was added to the stamp’s design.

HIGH-TECH IRONWORKS

In 1742, after bankruptcy was filed, the state took over the forges before it was handed over to Britain with the Treaty of Paris, but since 1735 and until the mid-1830s, these forges were considered North America’s most technologically advanced ironworks; however, they were also the continent’s oldest-operating blast furnace. By the time it closed in 1883, it had become obsolete.

The Bell Island design was resued for the final time in 1943 as part of the Waterlow Printings Definitive Re-Issues.

The Bell Island design was reused for the final time in 1943 as part of the Waterlow Printings Definitive Re-Issues.

In 1932, the Dominion of Newfoundland issued a 24-cent stamp (Scott #210) celebrating its own iron industry in the Bell Island area. Printed by Perkins, Bacon & Co., the light-blue stamp had its design reused on another 24-cent Newfoundland stamp (SC #241) that depicted King George VI, whose coronation took place on the date of issue, May 12, 1937. Lastly, in 1943, Newfoundland reissued this design on another 24-cent stamp (SC #264). Printed by Waterlow & Sons, this stamp was part of the Definitive Re-Issues series.

In 1973, to mark the 100th year since its closure, the Forges du Saint-Maurice became a National Historic Site of Canada.

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